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Raku Sun Sculpture

Raku Sculpture and Raku Pottery created in Switzerland
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J.W.Gruber
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Original Raku Sculpture and Raku Pottery Created by Artist
J.W.Gruber

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Raku Sculpture Sun

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Raku Sculpture Sun
Raku Sun Sculpture stands approx. 11 inches tall and was created from 2 slabs of a good robust raku clay. This piece was a spontaneous inspired response to the Raku Moon Sculpture. It was created one afternoon during late summer at my brother Milton's studio in La Chaux de Fonds, Switzerland. The white crackle glaze was created by my brother and I and worked beautifully. Sawdust was used to reduce the exposed clay to a nice charcoal black and penetration into the glaze crackle is excellent!
Raku espouses the spontaneity of events, almost accidental, where the elegance and uniqueness of “imperfections” may be seen from a perspective of unpretentious beauty. A connection to the elemental transition of impermanence that contacts the primal source of human nature. The art of Raku evokes an appreciation of the natural order of things that are fresh and uncomplicated. Raku espouses the spontaneity of events, almost accidental, where the elegance and uniqueness of "imperfections" may be seen from a perspective of unpretentious beauty. A connection to the elemental transition of impermanence that contacts the primal source of human nature. In the 1920's Bernard Leach, a well known English potter, learned the Raku technique while in Japan. When he returned to England he experimented with smoking the pottery in combustible materials thus introducing the style well known today. Raku as a sculptural technique is relatively new compared to the origin of it's inception and even older when considering the birth of it's inspiration. Originally the Raku technique was used to create tea sets for the Japanese tea ceremony. My work uses the smoked style to create a unique and spontaneous look to sculpture inspired by inner thought and peaceful reflection. There is a certain freedom that attracts me when working with Raku. Perhaps it is the spiritual foundation from which Raku originated or maybe it’s the necessary relinquishing of control in the firing. Or it may be just the simplicity of black and white symbolically represented. A Yin and Yang of its potential to express. Probably it is all these things. When a piece transcends the fire and smoke and is revealed for the first time I am thankful for being a part of its transformation from earth to clay to fire to water …..to art….to life……
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